In bloom: High Park cherry blossoms

On Friday, April 13, I spent a little time early in the morning at High Park in Toronto to capture photos of the cherry trees in blossom, which really only lasts for a week before they are gone.

Cherry tree blossoms
Cherry tree blossoms

On Friday, April 13, I spent a little time early in the morning at High Park in Toronto to capture photos of the cherry trees in blossom, which really only lasts for a week before they are gone.

As of 7:30 AM, the park is fairly quiet, but there were a lot of other photographers happily snapping away pictures of the trees and the blossoms, which made it interesting waiting for space to clear so you could get some angles.

That said, there was always space to shoot up at the branches, so I got quite a few decent closeup photos of the blossoms. Check them out below in these just-for-fun shots.

(Also, don’t forget to check us out on Facebook!)

Back-lit blossoms

Blossoms

Blossoms

Blossoms

Introducing Heritage Home Design

Phoenix Gate Studio is pleased to introduce one of our latest customers, Heritage Home Design, who specialize in window and door installations in the Toronto area.

Phoenix Gate Studio is pleased to introduce one of our latest customers, Heritage Home Design, who specialize in window and door installations in the Toronto area.

PGS worked with Heritage Home Design to create a website that suited the company, while also writing content for sections of the website and creating some graphical elements. Some graphical elements were developed with the help of Matthew Labutte from Design-O-Matic.ca.

In addition, PGS is working with Heritage Home Design to provide photography services, capturing images of renovated homes, as well as running the company’s social media marketing and search engine optimization strategies.

Heritage Home Design
Heritage Home Design

New camera, new perspective

Working with a new camera, which has a full frame sensor over my old crop sensor, has quite literally changed my entire perspective recently. I’ve used a full frame camera before, but using this camera full time now has changed how I look at subjects, lighting, and everything else.

Working with a new camera, which has a full frame sensor over my old crop sensor, has quite literally changed my entire perspective recently. I’ve used a full frame camera before, but using this camera full time now has changed how I look at subjects, lighting, and everything else.

For the uninitiated, the difference between my old crop sensor camera and the full frame camera is literally that with the same lens on both bodies, I have a wider frame of view with the full frame. What it amounts to is that on the crop sensor, the sensor is a notch smaller, but the lens projects the same view into the camera body. The effect is that, because the sensor is smaller than the image coming in, the image that is captured is cropped to the size of the sensor. Obviously anything else falls off the edge and isn’t captured in the image.

Full frame sensors, as the name suggests, are larger, and so photos captured with the bigger sensor have a wider perspective.

While full frame sensors capture bigger images, and are higher resolution because they serve the professional market, there is one benefit to crop sensors: if you’re trying to get extra close with your photos, zoom lenses on a crop sensor get a natural boost. If you have a 300mm zoom lens, on the crop body that 300mm actually work at around 450mm, which is obviously a big deal.

Right now I’m still toying with the camera’s features, but for now I wanted to re-start my photography blog with my first two new photos from the camera.

First snapshot - our wedding shoes
First snapshot - our wedding shoes
Mr. Logan - my parrot
Mr. Logan